Idioms related to Feelings and Emotions

Here you will learn 10 idioms related to feelings and emotions. Lose your temper, have butterflies in your stomach, down in the dumps meaning and more.

Learning idioms will help you improve your conversational English.

English Idioms related to Feelings and Emotions

English idioms related to feelings and emotions. Improve your English from intermediate to advanced with www.englishlessonviaskype.com #learnenglish #englishlessons #EnglishTeacher #vocabulary #ingles #английский #aprenderingles #english #cursodeingles #учианглийский #vocabulário #dicasdeingles #learningenglish #ingilizce #englishgrammar #englishvocabulary #ielts #idiomas

Share! Help other students to improve English skills.

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on whatsapp
Share on vk

Hi, this is Harry and welcome back to my English learning podcast Speak Better English with Harry.

Today, we’re going to take a look at idioms related to feelings and emotions.

I’m sure you all know that idioms are a great way to express yourself in English. And many English idioms often have some unusual history and go back in many different ways. So let me try and explain the meanings of these idioms and give you some examples. 

From Intermediate to Advanced English

INSANITY: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.

Albert Einstein
  • Learning English but can't speak fluently you're learning English without success
  • Confusing English language rules you're tired of confusing explanations
  • woman-gesturing-not-ok_1f645-200d-2640-fe0f you're sick of paying a lot of money
  • English for shy students you're shy, introverted or both
  • older-woman_emoji-modifier-fitzpatrick-type-3_1f475-1f3fc_1f3fc you're a mature student
  • Then my affordable & effective way 💯 to improve your English from intermediate to advanced is for you

English Idioms related to Feelings and Emotions

TO HAVE BUTTERFLIES IN YOUR STOMACH

Meaning: to experience a weird feeling caused by fear or nervousness

Usually happens when you’re about to go on stage for your acting debut. Or you’re about to go in for the beginning of your oral exams. Or when you’re about to propose marriage to your girlfriend.

Example:

I had terrible butterflies in my stomach when I had to make my first public presentation. 

TO BE THRILLED TO BITS

Meaning: to be really really excited

Example:

I’m thrilled to bits that I’m finally getting to see my football team play. I’ve been saving up for ages. 

I am thrilled to bits to meet my long-lost relatives.

TO LOSE YOUR TEMPER

Meaning: to get really annoyed, vexed or frustrated

When people lose their temper they often start shouting and screaming.

Example:

I really lost my temper with the kids yesterday when they broke my favourite golf club. 

English Idioms related to Feelings and Emotions

TO BE BORED STIFF

Meaning: to be really really bored; you’re so bored that you’re stiff meaning you can’t move, you can’t bend, you can’t go left or right

Example:

I went to see that new movie and within 10 minutes I was bored stiff. I was just sitting there wishing the movie would end. 

TO BE ON EDGE

Meaning: to be really anxious or nervous

If you’re waiting for something to happen and you’re fidgety and you start tapping your fingers.

Example:

I’m on edge, I’m getting my wisdom tooth removed.

TO KEEP YOUR COOL

Meaning: to remain calm despite a difficult situation

Example:

Deborah has kept her cool during the debate despite sharp words from the other side.

English Idioms related to Feelings and Emotions

TO GET COLD FEET 

Meaning: to realise that you don’t want to do something, to change your mind, to have second thoughts

Example:

I don’t think I’m going to go ahead with the wedding. I got cold feet. 

TO BREAK YOUR HEART

Meaning: to make someone very unhappy or sad

Example:

‘It breaks my heart to see the struggles that children and young people across the world face every day,’ David Beckham said.

A CHANGE OF HEART

Meaning: a change in the way one feels about something

and then finally

Example:

Sarah had a change of heart and cancelled her date with Peter.

TO BE DOWN IN THE DUMPS

Meaning: to be feeling a little bit depressed, not feeling good

Example:

Michael has been down in the dumps for days now. He hasn’t seen his girlfriend for a long time and then he got dropped from the football team. 

So there are idioms related to feelings and emotions:

  • to have butterflies in your stomach
  • to be thrilled to bits
  • to lose your temper
  • to be bored stiff
  • to be on edge
  • to keep your cool
  • to get cold feet 
  • to break your heart
  • a change of heart
  • to be down in the dumps

I hope you’ve enjoyed them. And if you want to contact me, you know where I am. I am very happy to hear from you and very happy to include your recommendations in my future podcast episodes. 

Down in the Dumps Meaning

Down in the dumps meaning. English idioms related to feelings and emotions.

Share! Help other students to improve English skills.

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on whatsapp
Share on vk

More information

For more information on English grammar rules, English collocations and English idioms, check out the links below:

Other words to say BRAVE in English

12 English idioms relating to COMMUNICATION

Difference betweeen think about and think of

 

This Post Has 2 Comments

  1. Juan

    lose your temper= to lose your composure? is it the same? Thanks a lot

    1. Harry

      Yes, Juan, lose your temper = lose your composure = lose control of yourself. Well done!

Leave a Reply