Difference between Stand Up and Get Up

Here you will learn the difference between stand up and get up. 

Stand up and get up are two confusing English verbs. And in many languages, there is no difference between stand up and get up. So often students ask this question,

Which verb do I use when I want to express the first thing I do in the morning? Do I have to say I get up or I stand up?

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stand up vs get up - video lesson

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Today I have two confusing English verbs for you:

to get up and to stand up

Students are always getting these two verbs confused.

They often tell me that they stand up in the morning when they wake up.

✔️ When we wake up, we get up

❌ When we wake up, we stand up.

We get out of bed, we get up, we stretch, we go and have a shower or whatever we do.

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So when you’re talking about rising in the morning, waking up, we always use the phrasal verb to get up.

To get up out of bed.

We get up and leave our bed.

When we stand up, we move to a standing position when somebody comes into the room. 

When a teacher enters the room, we stand up from our seats.

difference between stand up and get up

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Of course, they can sound the same.

✔️ We can get up out of a chair.

✔️ We can stand up when somebody comes in.

Stand up for yourself is another expression that we use. 

Stand up for your rights.

Meaning: be strong, stand up for what you believe in 

We don’t say 

Get up for what you believe in.

✔️ Stand up for what you believe in.

So get up in the morning, leave your bed.

Stand up for what you believe in.

Stand up when somebody comes into the room.

So you get up in the morning (not stand up), but you can either get up or stand up when you rise from a seated position in a chair/sofa (but with different implications).

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difference between stand up and get up

to get up

1. to wake up and leave your bed 

Example:

I woke up at 7, but then I realised it was Saturday, so I didn’t get up until 8.

2. to change your position from a lying or sitting one with the intention to move away

Example:

I got up from my chair and took a deep breath.

to stand up

to change your position from a lying, sitting, kneeling to a standing one; at the end, you are standing on your feet but you don’t move away

Example:

He stood up to greet me with a hearty smile and handshake.

to wake up

to stop sleeping and become awake

Example:

I usually wake up at 5 o’clock in the morning.

How to use stand up and get up

Everybody stood up and clapped all the way through the national anthem.

I stood up and hit the top of my head pretty hard on the corner of the shelf.

Should a man stand up when a woman enters the room?

Today we got up really late. Fortunately, we still got some breakfast at our hotel.

I get up no later than 7 am on the weekends.

More information

For more information on English grammar rules, English collocations and English idioms, check out the links below:

10 English idioms with DAY

How to negotiate on a price in English

Free materials for intermediate and advanced English are always available at Learning English with the BBC.

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