C1 English Collocations For Feelings (Negative)

Learn C1 English collocations for feelings and emotions. Negative feelings and emotions.

These English collocations will be useful to you if you are preparing for a Cambridge English exam (FCE, CAE, CPE, IELTS etc) Using advanced collocations in English conversation will help you sound more native when speaking English.

It’s important to learn through context and for that reason I give many useful examples in this advanced English lesson.

Listen to the podcast Speak Better English with Harry or watch it on YouTube at Learn English with Harry.

List of collocations for negative feelings

C1 English collocations for feelings (negative)

So what are we going to talk to you about today? In the advanced English lesson today, we’re going to look at advanced collocations for negative emotions and feelings.

And like always, I think I’ve got 10 of these. I’ll go through them one by one, and give you a few examples.

Intermediate to Advanced English Marathon

Insanity: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.

INSANITY: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.

Albert Einstein

to feel down

Meaning: to feel upset, to feel depressed

Example:

I’m just feeling a little down today. I don’t feel myself, I don’t know what it is. Maybe it’s the weather, maybe it’s just the time of the year. I just feel a little down.

to feel sick with worry/to be worried sick

Meaning: to be under a little bit of strain and feeling the stress

Example:

My daughter is worried sick about the exams that are just around the corner. They’re going to happen in a few weeks.

book your trial English Lesson

to give vent to something

Meaning: to let out your negative emotions

Examples:

He got a puncture on his bicycle. He picked the bike up and threw it on the ground to vent his anger.

He couldn’t get the last bit of that equation and vented his frustration by screaming aloud.

to weigh on your conscience/mind

Meaning: feeling a lot of worry, concern, or anxiety, especially for a long time

Examples: 

I just have all of these problems weighing on my mind. I’m not feeling good.

It’s weighing on my conscience; I should have lent her the money. She looked desperate.

C1 English collocations for feelings (negative)

C1 English collocations and emotions. Negative feelings. Expressions for FCE, CAE, IELTS. Online English lessons at www.englishlessonviaskype.com #learnenglish

Share and help other students to improve English language skills.

a heavy heart

Meaning: you have a heavy heart when you’re sad about something

Examples:

I have to tell you with a heavy heart that we have to cancel the holiday this year, we just can’t go.

It’s with a heavy heart that I failed them. They really need to try better the next time.

a nasty shock

Meaning: bad news, something you weren’t expecting

Examples:

I got a nasty shock when I opened the bill. The electricity has gone up by 60%. 60%! Can you believe it?

I got a nasty shock when I opened the letter and found out that I’d been caught speeding a few weeks ago.

These vets can really really charge a lot of money. What a nasty shock!

C1 English collocations for feelings (negative)

to dash somebody’s hopes

Meaning: to disappoint, to destroy someone’s plans

Examples:

If you get bad results in your exams, that dashes your hopes of getting into that university that you wanted to go to.

I saw the boy who I fancied walking out with another girl; that dashed my hopes about ever getting together with him.

dread to think

Meaning: you’re anxious and worried about something

Examples:

I dread to think what life would be like without mobile phones. How would we contact everybody?

I would dread to think what life would be like without online lessons. I’d have to waste hour after hour going to and back from classes.

C1 English collocations for feelings (negative)

C1 English collocations and emotions. Negative feelings. Expressions for FCE, CAE, IELTS. Online English lessons at www.englishlessonviaskype.com #learnenglish

bear a grudge

Meaning: an ill feeling you hold against somebody because of sth they said/did

Example:

Obviously, she bears a grudge against me. She doesn’t come near me. She doesn’t talk to me.

to bottle up your feelings

Meaning: try not to express your feelings

Example:

Don’t bottle up your feelings, you’ll feel worse, it’ll make you feel sick. So let it out, go outside and scream.

Ok, so ten C1 English collocations for feelings and emotions. Negative feelings and emotions.

Let me go down through them one more time.

  • to feel down
  • to feel sick with worry or to be worried sick
  • to give vent to something
  • to weigh on your conscience/mind
  • a heavy heart
  • (to get) a nasty shock 
  • dread to think about something.
  • to bear/hold a grudge
  • to dash somebody’s hopes
  • to bottle up your feelings

If you want to contact me, you can do so at www.englishlessonviaskype.com. If you, your family member, or somebody you know would like to have one-to-one online English lessons, please get in touch. Book your trial lesson. And we will help you to improve your business English or your conversational English.

Okay, as always, I appreciate you watching and listening. Join me again soon.

More information

For more information on English grammar rules, English collocations and English idioms, check out the links below:

Must-have English phrases for online meetings

10 English expressions with KEEP

You can always study English advanced level at Learning English with the BBC and British Council Learn English.

You will love these English lessons