9 Phrasal Verbs about Politics

Here you will learn 9 English phrasal verbs about politics: to blow over, to stand down, to crack down on something or somebody.

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Phrasal Verbs about Politics

9 Phrasal verbs about politics. To blow over, to crack down on something meaning. Learn English with Harry at www.englishlessonviaskype.com #learnenglish #englishlessons #tienganh #EnglishTeacher #vocabulary #ingles #อังกฤษ #английский #aprenderingles #english #cursodeingles #учианглийский #vocabulário #dicasdeingles #learningenglish #ingilizce #englishgrammar #englishvocabulary #ielts #idiomas

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Hi there, this is Harry and welcome back to our podcast where I try to help you with your understanding of the English language and also help you to improve your written English and more importantly, your spoken English so you feel more comfortable and confident when you’re speaking to native English speakers.

So what do I have for you today? Well, today, we’re going to look at some phrasal verbs about politics.

Of course, these phrasal verbs are not exclusively used when we’re talking about politics, but they can be used in that situation.

So I’m going to give 9 phrasal verbs about politics, and then we’ll give you an example of how we use them.

Phrasal Verbs about Politics

TO BRING IN

Meaning: to introduce changes, to introduce new rules

Well, this is what all governments do. They bring in new laws, they bring in changes they bring in restrictions means they introduce changes.

The new government elected in the UK brought in the law, which finally meant that Britain was going to leave the European Union.

TO GO BACK ON

Meaning: to reverse your decision, to break your word

When we say to go back on it usually means that you break your word, or you you go back on your word, meaning you promised something earlier, but for whatever reason, you’re not able to fulfil that promise. 

But more often than not, due to financial constraints, economic issues, the government isn’t able to deliver on every promise. So they have to go back on their word in relation to some aspects.

So when you go back on your word, you break your promise, and things are not quite the way you had intended.

Phrasal Verbs about Politics

TO BLOW OVER

Meaning: something will disappear or end without serious consequences and it’ll go back to normal

It will be an issue for a while, but then finally, it will disappear and nobody will be talking about it.

If we look at the clouds outside and it’s about to rain but it’ll blow over in a minute.

Meaning the wind will take the clouds away.

So that’s the literal meaning of it.

But in political circumstances, to blow over means that some situation will soon disappear and it’ll be back to normal.

There was a particular problem in the government, and the newspapers, were putting pressure on the ministers. But we all know that there’ll be another problem next week, and this will soon blow over.

TO COVER UP

Meaning: to hide or conceal something, to not disclose information

This particular phrasal verb is used a lot with governments because when mistakes are made, they might not always want the public to know about it.

And therefore they may hide the facts of the truth or try to cover up the problem and therefore either blame somebody else or not disclosed information so they don’t bring it to the public’s attention.

In an attempt to take attention away, they tried to cover up their mistakes.

Phrasal Verbs about Politics

TO PUT FORWARD

Meaning: to bring forward ideas to propose, suggest or recommend something

When we put forward something, it’s usually a suggestion, or it could be a proposal, or indeed a recommendation.

Governments usually put forward ideas in the form of white or green papers.

TO CRACK DOWN ON SOMETHING or SOMEBODY

Meaning: to introduce severe measures to stop or prevent something, usually some illegal activities (drug dealing or crime, criminal activities, crime and criminal activities) 

They try from time to time to crack down on those hard criminals.

The government will boost the resources of the police in an affort to crack down on crime.

Phrasal Verbs about Politics

TO STAND DOWN

Meaning: it is specifically used when a Member of Parliament or the Prime Minister decide not to continue their political career or not to go forward for election

The leader of the party announced yesterday that he’s going to stand down.

So it’s a an announcement of their retirement.

The Prime Minister today announced that he was going to stand down at the end of his term before the next election.

Anybody can stand down from the job and the position.

For example, a mayor or a public representative they stand down, they all retire. So it’s not limited specifically to politicians

TO FACE UP TO SOMETHING

Meaning: to accept that a bad situation exists and try to deal with it

  • to face up to facts
  • to face up to a person
  • face up to your responsibilities

It’s the government’s responsibility to face up to the fact that the economy is not working or isn’t improving, or has some difficulties.

So when they face up to these facts, they have to introduce measures to change it.

They face up to another government in another country that is making life difficult for them in terms of trade. 

In this sentence to face up to them means that they will not allow themselves to be bullied, they will face up and challenge the other government.

Phrasal Verbs about Politics

9 Phrasal verbs about politics. To blow over, to crack down on something meaning. Learn English with Harry at www.englishlessonviaskype.com #learnenglish #englishlessons #tienganh #EnglishTeacher #vocabulary #ingles #อังกฤษ #английский #aprenderingles #english #cursodeingles #учианглийский #vocabulário #dicasdeingles #learningenglish #ingilizce #englishgrammar #englishvocabulary #ielts #idiomas

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TO WIN SOMEONE OVER

Meaning: to get someone to change their opinion about you, to win someone’s confidence 

The government will win lots of voters over if they make lots of promises. 

For example, they will increase the basic wage, they will increase the minimum salaries, they will spend more money on policing, they will spend more money on social welfare benefits.

These would all be attractive measures by which a government coming into office can win the people over. 

Now you’ve learnt 9 English phrasal verbs about politics. Thanks for listening. If you want to contact me, you can do so. Always happy to hear questions, suggestions and happy to help you if I can in our future podcasts. Join me again soon.

9 Phrasal verbs about politics. To blow over, to crack down on something meaning. Learn English with Harry at www.englishlessonviaskype.com #learnenglish #englishlessons #tienganh #EnglishTeacher #vocabulary #ingles #อังกฤษ #английский #aprenderingles #english #cursodeingles #учианглийский #vocabulário #dicasdeingles #learningenglish #ingilizce #englishgrammar #englishvocabulary #ielts #idiomas

More information

For more information on English grammar rules, English collocations and English idioms, check out the links below:

English verb collocations with HOME

English idioms with TWO WORDS

Difference between UNLESS and UNTIL in English

LIE or LAY in English

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