10 Idioms about Thinking and Learning

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  • Post last modified:14/01/2021
  • Post category:English Idioms
  • Reading time:6 mins read

Here you will learn 10 English idioms about thinking and learning.聽

Understand the meanings and start using thinking and learning idioms in your English speaking and writing.聽

Thinking and Learning Idioms - Podcast Episode 206

Table of Contents

English idioms about thinking and learning

ENGLISH IDIOMS: Learn 10 idioms about thinking and learning. From intermediate to advanced English with www.englishlessonviaskype.com #learnenglish #englishlessons #EnglishTeacher #vocabulary #ingles #喔副喔囙竵喔む俯 #邪薪谐谢懈泄褋泻懈泄 #aprenderingles #english #cursodeingles #褍褔懈邪薪谐谢懈泄褋泻懈泄 #vocabul谩rio #dicasdeingles #learningenglish #ingilizce #englishgrammar #englishvocabulary #ielts #idiomas

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Hi there, this is Harry and welcome to my English learning podcast Speak Better English with Harry.

Here I try to help you to get a better understanding of the English language so that you can communicate in a better way. We do that by looking at English idioms, phrasal verbs, expressions, collocations, every aspect of English.

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In this particular episode, we’re going to take a look at some English idioms about thinking and learning. I’ll give you a list of the idioms, then I’ll give you a meaning, and I’ll try to put them into a little example for you.

go to your head

Meaning: when someone thinks that they are better or more important than really are, to become too complacent

We can use it in a positive or a negative way.

Examples:

I know you had an amazing year in sales, but don鈥檛 let your success go to your head next year. You have to start all over again.

I wonder will that promotion go to his head? Would he start thinking that he is above all of us? It’s only a few weeks since he has joined the company.

have your wits about you

Meaning: to be able to think quickly, to think on your feet and make sensible decisions being careful at the same time, to be alert

Examples:

When you go into that important meeting, just have your wits about you. Listen carefully to what they’re saying because it can be tricky.

She kept her wits about her and was able to tell the police who attacked her.

English idioms about thinking and learning

ENGLISH IDIOMS: Learn 10 idioms about thinking and learning. From intermediate to advanced English with www.englishlessonviaskype.com #learnenglish #englishlessons #EnglishTeacher #vocabulary #ingles #喔副喔囙竵喔む俯 #邪薪谐谢懈泄褋泻懈泄 #aprenderingles #english #cursodeingles #褍褔懈邪薪谐谢懈泄褋泻懈泄 #vocabul谩rio #dicasdeingles #learningenglish #ingilizce #englishgrammar #englishvocabulary #ielts #idiomas

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in the dark (about)

Meaning: to not know very much about something because other people keep it secret, or don鈥檛 share information with you

Example:

I鈥檓 completely in the dark about this new account. I鈥檝e been away on holidays for a couple of weeks and I wasn鈥檛 included in emails.

In the early days, scientists were completely in the dark as to exactly how this new drug was working.

not to have a leg to stand on

Meaning: to be left in an uneasy or vulnerable position, to not be able to prove that you鈥檙e right about something

Example:

We just have to accept what they say because we don鈥檛 have a leg to stand on. We didn鈥檛 keep any copies of the emails.

not see the wood for the trees

Meaning: to not be able to understand what is really in a particular situation because you鈥檙e thinking too much about small details

Examples:

We had important things, housing and healthcare crisis, but the politicians couldn’t see the wood for the trees.

Hold on, hold on, you can’t see the wood for the trees. The answer is there in front of you, this is what we agreed with the customer.

In American English, they say not see the forest for the trees.

English idioms about thinking and learning

put two and two together

Meaning: to guess what is happening or what something means based on the information or facts that you have seen or heard

Example:

After looking at all the old photos, I’ve just put two and two together and realised that I know her sister!

quick or slow on the uptake

Meaning: taking a short/long time to figure things out, to understand something

Examples:

This guy, he’s so slow on the uptake. I must have explained that to him four times and he still comes back and asks me again how it works.

I鈥檝e just told him once, and now he’s running the programme perfectly. He’s very quick on the uptake.

ring a bell

Meaning: something sounds familiar although you may not be able to remember the exact details

Examples:

His name rings a bell…I鈥檓 sure I鈥檝e come across this name before. I think I met him two years ago at that conference.

It definitely rings a bell with me, though I don’t know either an artist or a song title.

English idioms about thinking and learning

split hairs

Meaning: to argue or worry about small details or small differences that are not really so important

Example:

There’s no point splitting hairs over this, just agree that you’ll share this laptop with Jake until we can save up and buy you another one.

round the bend

Meaning: crazy, insane

Example:

Wearing a watch over a sleeve cuff looks a bit round the bend to me.

The third question drove him round the bend, he really couldn’t puzzle it out and had to move on.

So there are my 10 English idioms about thinking and learning. Let鈥檚 go through them one more time:

  • go to your head
  • have your wits about you
  • be in the dark
  • not to have a leg to stand on
  • not see the woods/forest for the trees
  • put two and two together
  • quick or slow on the uptake
  • ring a bell
  • split hairs
  • round the bend

As always if you want to contact me then you can do so on www.englishlessonviaskype.com. I鈥檓 always happy to hear from you and happy for you to give me some suggestions that I can include in my future podcast episodes.

Thanks for listening. Join me again soon.

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More information

For more information on English grammar rules, English collocations and English idioms, check out the links below:

10 Ways to say IMPORTANT in English

Idioms related to feelings and emotions

Don’t forget about Learning English with the BBC.

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